Category Archives: Trash Knight Garden & Tool holder

Tips and Disposal Guide

Some products we use around our homes contain hazardous ingredients. These include many household cleaners, nail polish remover, motor oil, weed killer, hobby supplies, car batteries, household batteries, fluorescent bulbs, sharps, some electronics and bug sprays.
hazardous_waste_2
Hazardous waste in your home?
Can it harm you, your children, pets and the environment?
The answer is YES!

Many household products are made of chemicals that can harm us. If these items are used, stored or disposed of improperly, you, your pets or the environment can be injured.

Hazardous materials dumped on the ground or into the gutter can contaminate soil and the underground water supply — Fresno’s primary source of water. This page provides you with a guide for the disposal of hazardous products.

Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Events
To protect you, your family, pets and the environment, these products must be used carefully and disposed of properly. Please don’t put HHW products in the trash, on the ground, down the sewer or into the gutter. Save them for a household hazardous waste drop-off event.

The City of Fresno and Fresno County co-sponsor two household hazardous waste drop-off events each year, one in the spring and one in the fall. Dates are advertised in the Fresno Bee. To find out about the next event dates, call Fresno County, 262-4259 or Visit the Website.

(See our disposal guide below)

How can you tell if a product is hazardous ?
Check the label on the container for key words:


Things to keep in mind:

Purchase only what you need. Buy small amounts, check the label for the above key words and avoid purchasing hazardous products

Read and follow label directions carefully. When you must use a hazardous substance, apply only as directed and only as much as is needed.

Wear protective clothing such as safety glasses and gloves in well-ventilated areas.

Store hazardous products in the original containers, in a cool dry place, away from children, pets and food. Check for leaks. Do not mix products or store products together that may be incompatible. This may cause toxic themical reactions such as: explosions, fires, skin and eye irritations. Do not store hazardous products for more than one year from date of purchase.

Keep the number of the Poison Control Center visible and posted near the telephone in case of emergency. 1(800) 222-1222 You can also visit their website.

 

DISPOSAL GUIDE

Some important terms:

Explosive – Can catch fire, explode or give off dangerous fumes when exposed to water or air.
Reactive – Unstable chemicals that may react spontaneously with flammables, water, or other chemicals – may by explosive.
Poisonous / Toxic – May cause injury or death when inhaled (breathing), ingested (eating or drinking), or absorbed through the skin (touching).
Corrosive – Can “eat through” clothes, metal, etc. and severely burn skin.
Flammable – Can catch on fire.

All items listed (except weapons) can be taken to a Household Hazardous Waste Event. For information and dates call 262-4259 or visit the Fresno County Website regarding these events.

All starred (*) items can be dried out outside, away from kids and pets, then placed in the gray trash container.

These items are Corrosive & Toxic – Do Not Mix with Other Substances

  • Ammonia-based products
  • Bathroom/Kitchen cleaners
  • Bleach
  • Car Wax (solvents)
  • Chlorine cleaners
  • Disinfectant
  • Drain Openers
  • Glass cleaners
  • Pool Chemicals
  • Oven cleaners

These items are Explosive – Take to the Police or Sheriff’s Department

  • Ammunition
  • Firearms

These items are Flammable

  • Aerosol sprays
  • Disinfecting sprays
  • Deodorant sprays
  • Hairspray

These items are Flammable, Corrosive & Toxic

  • Asphalt
  • Driveway Sealants
  • Roofing Tar*
  • Rug & Upholstery Cleaner*
  • Rust Remover*
  • Thinners

These items are Flammable & Toxic

  • Cleaner/Degreaser
  • Copper Polish*
  • Diesel Fuel
  • Enamel
  • Floor polish*
  • Furniture polish*
  • Gasoline
  • Kerosene
  • Motor Oil
  • Nail Polish Remover*
  • Oil-Based Paint
  • Shoe polish*
  • Silver polish*
  • Spot Remover*
  • Stains
  • Solvents
  • Stripper
  • Transmission Fluid
  • Turpentine
  • Varnishes
  • Wood Preservatives

These items are Toxic

  • Abrasives
  • Antifreeze
  • Artist/Model Paint* (leftover paint must be taken to HHW event but a completely empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Batteries(radios, toys, etc)
  • Car Batteries
  • Fertilizer
  • Fluorescent Bulbs
  • Fungicides
  • Herbicides
  • Insecticides
  • Medicine
  • Mercury (please click here for more information)
  • Mothballs
  • Latex Paint* (leftover paint should be soaked up with kitty litter and placed in the gray cart but the empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Oil Based Paint (leftover paint must be taken to HHW event but a completely empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Scouring Powder
  • Water-Based Paint* (leftover paint should be soaked up with kitty litter and placed in the gray cart but the empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Weed Killer
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Earth Day – April 22, 2013

What do people do

The April 22 Earth Day is usually celebrated with outdoor performances, where individuals or groups perform acts of service to earth. Typical ways of observing Earth Day include planting trees, picking up roadside trash, conducting various programs for recycling and conservation, using recyclable containers for snacks and lunches. Some people are encouraged to sign petitions to governments, calling for stronger or immediate action to stop global warming and to reverse environmental destruction.  Television stations frequently air programs dealing with environmental issues.

earthday

Public Life

Earth Day is not a public holiday and public life, with regard to transport schedules and opening hours for schools and businesses, is not affected.

Background

The April 22 Earth Day, founded by Senator Gaylord Nelson, was first organized in 1970 to promote ecology and respect for life on the planet as well as to encourage awareness of the growing problems of air, water and soil pollution.

Some people prefer to observe Earth Day around the time of the March equinox. In 1978, American anthropologist Margaret Mead added her support for the equinox Earth Day, founded by John McConnell. She stated that the selection of the March Equinox for Earth Day made planetary observance of a shared event possible.

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Symbols

Symbols used by people to describe Earth Day include: an image or drawing of planet earth; a tree, a flower or leaves depicting growth; or the recycling symbol. Colors used for Earth Day include natural colors such as green, brown or blue.

The “Earth Flag”, which was designed by John McConnell, has been described as a “flag for all people”. It features a two-sided dye printed image of the Earth from space on a dark blue field, made from recyclable, weather-resistant polyester. Margaret Mead believed that a flag that showed the earth as seen from space was appropriate.

 

 

Ground Squirrels in the Foothills

Squirrels

Keeping Animals Out of Your Garden

Animals

 

 

Try Grasscycling or Composting

What is Grasscycling?
Grasscycling is the natural recycling of grass by leaving the clippings on the lawn when mowing. Grass clippings decompose quickly and release valuable nutrients back into your lawn. It’s simple, and it works! Grass clippings make up a big part of California’s waste during the growing season. To keep these out of the waste stream, try grasscycling!
Grasscycling provides free fertilizer and helps make lawns greener and healthier. Grasscycling reduces turf grass fertilizer and water requirements, which can reduce the toxic runoff that enters storm drains and pollutes creeks and rivers. Grasscycling reduces mowing time too since it eliminates the need to bag and dispose of clippings.
Grasscycling also reduces the amount of yard waste disposed in landfills. Lawns can generate 300 pounds of grass clippings per 1000 square feet annually. For more information on grasscycling from the California Integrated Waste Management Board, visit www.ciwmb.ca.gov.

grasscycle-pic

Backyard Composting
Backyard composting is nature’s way of recycling. Composting is fun, easy and educational. Decomposed organic material such as leaves, grass clippings, twigs, fruit and vegetables make a great soil conditioner. Compost made from leaves and yard trimmings is great for your landscaping. To learn more about composting, visit www.ciwmb.ca.gov. or the “Master Gardener’s of Fresno County” website.

Information & Fun for Kids


Play the Fresno Recycles Game
from http://www.fresno.govClick on the images below to learn more about recycling.

 

Aluminum

Plastic

Glass

Bi-Metal

Paper

If you want to learn more about recycling, go to these kid friendly pages and play the numerous games available.

Kids Pages
Recycle Rex
Clean Sweep U.S.A
EPA Planet Protector’s Club
EPA Recycle City
Kids Recycle
How is Paper Recycled?
The Imagination Factory’s Trash Matcher– Ways to Reuse Garbage Before Throwing it Away
Eek! Recycling and Beyond
Waste No Words– Crossword Puzzle
Earth 911 Kids

Check Us Out in Cabin Life!

Whether you own a cabin, cottage, lakehome or lodge, or you just dream of owning one, Cabin Life magazine captures the essence of the vacation-home lifestyle – escape and reconnection.

CBNcoversA breath of fresh air, award-winning Cabin Life gives you great ideas, information and inspiration for enjoying your vacation home. And when you just can’t get to your special getaway, Cabin Life provides that mental escape to tide you over until your next trip.

Launched in 2001, Cabin Life enjoys rapid growth and strong reader loyalty. Cabin Life is unique because it is both a home and lifestyle publication, and also because it appeals to everyone — young and old, male and female, owners and dreamers.

Trash Knight is currently advertising in Cabin Life.

 

Trash Knight Facts

Q. What can the TRASH KNIGHT do for me?

A. The main use of the TRASH KNIGHT has always been to keep animals out of residential garbage, but it does other things as well.

1. The rolling and towable models are an excellent mobility aid for older folks or a simple convenience for anybody who doesn’t want to make multiple trips to the curb lugging heavy trash cans. Your garbage can be taken out on ‘trash night’ (the night before your trash service comes), to avoid having to take it out before dawn on ‘trash day’ for fear of animal intrusion.

2. The TRASH KNIGHT can get your garbage cans out of the garage. Tired of that odor when you go to get in your car?

3. The TRASH KNIGHT opens your cans for you. No more prying unsanitary lids off. Taking the garbage out is now ‘touchless’. Germaphobes rejoice!

4. Reduce your trash can expense. The Rubbermaid BRUTEtm trash can is an extremely  tough commercial grade product. They are expensive, but last a very long time, and the Trash Man can’t throw the lids when they are attached to the unit. In fact, my trash man likes the fact that he never has to pick up my trash so much that he has agreed to gently place my cans back in my TRASH KNIGHT rather than tossing them on the ground.

5. The TRASH KNIGHT can be used for storage of animal feed of almost any type. From rabbits to horses, one of our models can simplify feeding time and ensure varmint proof storage.

For more information about the Trash Knight garbage system, please visit www.trashknight.com.

A Timeline of Trash

An interesting perspective of trash, the disposal process and the future of trash. Trash Knight encourages you to dispose of trash, recyclables and compost items accordingly.

A Timeline of Trash
Date Location Notes
6,500 BC North America Archeological studies shows a clan of Native Americans in what is now Colorado produced an average of 5.3 pounds of waste a day.
500 BC Athens Greece First municipal dump in western world organized. Regulations required waste to be dumped at least a mile from the city limits.
New Testament of Bible Jerusalem Palestine The Valley of Gehenna also called Sheoal in the New Testament of the Bible “Though I descent into Sheol, thou art there.” Sheoal was apparently a dump outside of the city of that periodically burned. It became synonymous with “hell.”
1388 England English Parliament bars waste dispersal in public waterways and ditches.
1400 Paris France Garbage piles so high outside of Paris gates that it interferes with city defense.
1690 Philadelphia Rittenhouse Mill, Philadelphia makes paper from recycled fibers (waste paper and rags).
1842 England A report links disease to filthy environmental conditions – “age of sanitation” begins.
1874 Nottingham England A new technology called “the Destructor” provided the first systematic incineration of refuse in Nottingham, England. Until this time, much of the burning was accidental, a result of methane production.
1885 Governor’s Island NY The first garbage incinerator was built in USA (on Governor’s Island in NY)
1889 Washington DC Washington DC reported that we were running out of appropriate places for refuse (sound familiar?).
1896 United States Waste reduction plants arrive in US. (for compressing organic wastes). Later closed because of noxious emissions.
1898 New York NY has first rubbish sorting plant for recycling (are we reinventing the wheel?).
Turn of Century By the turn of the century the garbage problem was seen as one of the greatest problems for local authorities.
1900 “Piggeries” were developed to eat fresh or cooked garbage (In the mid-50’s an outbreak of vesicluar exenthama resulted in the destruction of 1,000s of pigs that had eaten raw garbage. Law passed requiring that garbage had to be cooked before it could be fed to swine).
1911 New York City NYC citizens were producing 4.6 pounds of refuse a day (remember the Native Americans from 6500 BC mentioned above?).
1914 United States there were about 300 incinerators in the US for burning trash.
1920’s Landfills were becoming a popular way of reclaiming swamp land while getting rid of trash.
1954 Olympia Washington Olympia Washington pays for return of aluminum cans.
1965 United States The first federal solid waste management laws were enacted.
1968 By 1968 companies began buy back recycling of containers.
1970 United States The first Earth Day was celebrated, the Environmental Protection Agency EPA created and the Resource Recovery Act enacted.
1976 United States In 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was created emphasizing recycling and HW management. This was the result of two major events: the oil embargo and the discovery (or recognition) of Love Canal.
1979 United States The EPA issued criteria prohibiting open dumping.
Today The list goes on and on.

“Plant a Garden at School or Home”

A month of Earth Day inspired posts…visit http://act.earthday.org to make your pledge!

Planting a garden at a school or at home is recognized universally as one of the best ways to teach children of every age the life sciences, to inspire a greater desire for whole foods and generally to reconnect them with Nature.

Since 2007, Earth Day Network has helped green over 100 schools, including many school gardens.

How to start (Information from http://urbanext.illinois.edu/firstgarden/)

Part of gardening is making a list of what you will need. Are there tools you need to get? Will you borrow or buy them? What seeds and plants do you want? Make a list of the items you need. Check whether you have them or need to get them. Then you can figure how much money you will need to plant a garden. Click here for a printable PDF version.

Not everybody starts planting all on the same day. If you live in Northern California you might start planting some time in March or April. But if you live in Florida or Southern California you might be able to plant things all year round. So, what guides us in knowing when it’s safe to start planting certain plants? The clue is called climate zones and it is based on frost-free dates for the area of the country or state where you live.

There is a frost-free date in the spring that tells you when it’s safe to start planting tender vegetables or plants that do not like frost. There is also a first-frost date for fall that tells you when it’s going to get too cold for a lot of things to grow well. The number of days between these two is called the growing season.

Some plants really like the cold and do well. Other plants are real warm weather lovers and don’t even like a slight chill. With more experience, you’ll soon get to know which plants like it cold and which ones like it warm.

To find out the frost-free dates for your part of the country or state, visit a library, garden center or Extension office and look up or ask about the frost-free dates in your area. You may also see large maps with bright colors and numbers from 1 – 11 on them. These are hardiness zone maps. You’ll see that zone 1 is the coldest (shortest growing season) up to zone 11 (longest growing season).

Another thing to keep in mind is that a date on the calendar does not always give you the green light to start gardening. Don’t forget to always get to know your soil up close and personal by giving it the squeeze test. This will tell you when you can work your soil safely.

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