Category Archives: Trash Knight

Educational & Informational Presentations


The Recycling Program staff of the City of Fresno is pleased to offer the opportunity to schedule a presentation or participate in a community outreach event, located within the city of Fresno, for your students or members of your service organization. To make arrangements, please click here or call the Recycling Hotline at 621-1111. Click the image to the left to visit our “Grow up Green” website where you can see a short video of a recycling presentation.

 

Schools

Recycling presentations are available to pre-k, elementary, middle schools, high schools and colleges, within the City of Fresno. Interactive and entertaining presentations cover information on recycling, resource conservation, and protection of the environment. Students will learn about the importance of recycling programs available to them in Fresno. Our staff is happy to work with you to relate the information and materials covered in your curriculum.

Each presentation takes between 45 minutes to an hour or can be tailored to meet your needs. Handouts, videos and visual aides reinforce the information. There is no fee and all handouts are free.

The program is funded by the City of Fresno and various state grants and focuses on the following areas of recycling:

Community Service Organizations

Recycling Program staff are available to make presentations to community service organizations within the city of Fresno. Topics include recycling, resources conservation, and protection of the environment. To schedule a presentation, please click here or call the Recycling Hotline at 621-1111.

Community and School Events

As part of our goal to educate the residents of the City of Fresno about recycling and protecting our natural resources, Recycling Program staff are available to participate in events, within the city of Fresno, that promote environmental awareness. They are also available to attend community-wide school events such as science fairs, career days and Earth Day events located within the city of Fresno. For more information, or to schedule a presentation or event, please click here or call the Recycling Hotline at 621-1111.

Additional Resources and Supplemental Materials

Educational Packets – includes information on Solid Waste and Recycling services and opportunities throughout the City of Fresno.

“Closing the Loop” Curriculum (grades K – 6) – provides current and accurate waste management information. Enables students to get involved with hands-on action-oriented projects. (Available online at www.CalRecycle.gov).

“A Child’s Place in the Environment” Curriculum (grades 1 – 6) – provides teachers with an environmental education program that encourages students to become environmentally aware and active. (Available online at www.ACPE.Lake.K12.ca.us)

“Teens for Planet Earth” Website (grades 9 – 12) – provides teens and adults who work with with teens, resources to carry out environmental service-learning projects in their community. (Available online at: www.teens4planetearth.com)

For more recycling information and links to games, click here to go to our “Kid’s Pages

To contact the City of Fresno Recycling Program, please click here or call 621-1111.

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Trash and Animals

Knowing the potential impact of trash on wildlife can save an animal’s life.  Did you know that …

Bird Paw  An animal can experience a fatal blockage if he swallows packaging material while attempting to eat the residue off of it?

  An animal’s head can get stuck inside certain plastic and glass containers causing suffocation or overheating?  In particular, certain yogurt containers that are narrower at the top and wider at the bottom are especially dangerous for animals.

Bird Paw  Six-pack beverage rings can get stuck around an animal’s nose, mouth and neck, blocking off her means of breathing, eating, drinking and self defense?

  Broken glass and sharp edges on cans can cut an animal’s paws and mouth as he attempts to eat food residue off of them?

To help keep animals safe, the MSPCA encourages you to use the following checklist when putting out trash:

checkmark  Rinse all of your recyclables to remove residue and odors.

checkmark  Put lids back on containers tightly. If the lids have been misplaced, crush the containers.

checkmark  Use a can opener that opens cans beneath the lip of the lids, leaving only smooth edges on the cans and lids.  Make sure to completely separate lids from cans.

checkmark  Cut up all six-pack beverage holders and other similar packaging so that there are no closed rings.

checkmark  Use critter-proof trash containers. Like Trash Knight.

checkmark  Recycle all plastic bags at your local grocery store. Don’t put plastic bags in the trash.

checkmark  Cut fishing line up into small pieces or tie it into a secure bundle so that it cannot be unwound.

checkmark  Switch to brands that have less packaging and buy food in bulk to avoid creating excess trash.

checkmark  Spread the word!  Teach your kids, friends, and family to do the same!

Paper Recycling

Paper

Paper, which includes everything from packaging to mail, makes up the largest percentage of the municipal solid waste stream at 33 percent. It’s also one of the most recovered materials, as recycling opportunities are often readily available.

Everything You Need to Know About Paper Recycling

In 2011, 66.8 percent of paper consumed in the United States was recycled. Every ton of paper recycled saves more than 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space, and if you measure by weight, more paper is recovered for recycling than plastic, aluminum and glass combined.

 

Tips and Disposal Guide

Some products we use around our homes contain hazardous ingredients. These include many household cleaners, nail polish remover, motor oil, weed killer, hobby supplies, car batteries, household batteries, fluorescent bulbs, sharps, some electronics and bug sprays.
hazardous_waste_2
Hazardous waste in your home?
Can it harm you, your children, pets and the environment?
The answer is YES!

Many household products are made of chemicals that can harm us. If these items are used, stored or disposed of improperly, you, your pets or the environment can be injured.

Hazardous materials dumped on the ground or into the gutter can contaminate soil and the underground water supply — Fresno’s primary source of water. This page provides you with a guide for the disposal of hazardous products.

Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Events
To protect you, your family, pets and the environment, these products must be used carefully and disposed of properly. Please don’t put HHW products in the trash, on the ground, down the sewer or into the gutter. Save them for a household hazardous waste drop-off event.

The City of Fresno and Fresno County co-sponsor two household hazardous waste drop-off events each year, one in the spring and one in the fall. Dates are advertised in the Fresno Bee. To find out about the next event dates, call Fresno County, 262-4259 or Visit the Website.

(See our disposal guide below)

How can you tell if a product is hazardous ?
Check the label on the container for key words:


Things to keep in mind:

Purchase only what you need. Buy small amounts, check the label for the above key words and avoid purchasing hazardous products

Read and follow label directions carefully. When you must use a hazardous substance, apply only as directed and only as much as is needed.

Wear protective clothing such as safety glasses and gloves in well-ventilated areas.

Store hazardous products in the original containers, in a cool dry place, away from children, pets and food. Check for leaks. Do not mix products or store products together that may be incompatible. This may cause toxic themical reactions such as: explosions, fires, skin and eye irritations. Do not store hazardous products for more than one year from date of purchase.

Keep the number of the Poison Control Center visible and posted near the telephone in case of emergency. 1(800) 222-1222 You can also visit their website.

 

DISPOSAL GUIDE

Some important terms:

Explosive – Can catch fire, explode or give off dangerous fumes when exposed to water or air.
Reactive – Unstable chemicals that may react spontaneously with flammables, water, or other chemicals – may by explosive.
Poisonous / Toxic – May cause injury or death when inhaled (breathing), ingested (eating or drinking), or absorbed through the skin (touching).
Corrosive – Can “eat through” clothes, metal, etc. and severely burn skin.
Flammable – Can catch on fire.

All items listed (except weapons) can be taken to a Household Hazardous Waste Event. For information and dates call 262-4259 or visit the Fresno County Website regarding these events.

All starred (*) items can be dried out outside, away from kids and pets, then placed in the gray trash container.

These items are Corrosive & Toxic – Do Not Mix with Other Substances

  • Ammonia-based products
  • Bathroom/Kitchen cleaners
  • Bleach
  • Car Wax (solvents)
  • Chlorine cleaners
  • Disinfectant
  • Drain Openers
  • Glass cleaners
  • Pool Chemicals
  • Oven cleaners

These items are Explosive – Take to the Police or Sheriff’s Department

  • Ammunition
  • Firearms

These items are Flammable

  • Aerosol sprays
  • Disinfecting sprays
  • Deodorant sprays
  • Hairspray

These items are Flammable, Corrosive & Toxic

  • Asphalt
  • Driveway Sealants
  • Roofing Tar*
  • Rug & Upholstery Cleaner*
  • Rust Remover*
  • Thinners

These items are Flammable & Toxic

  • Cleaner/Degreaser
  • Copper Polish*
  • Diesel Fuel
  • Enamel
  • Floor polish*
  • Furniture polish*
  • Gasoline
  • Kerosene
  • Motor Oil
  • Nail Polish Remover*
  • Oil-Based Paint
  • Shoe polish*
  • Silver polish*
  • Spot Remover*
  • Stains
  • Solvents
  • Stripper
  • Transmission Fluid
  • Turpentine
  • Varnishes
  • Wood Preservatives

These items are Toxic

  • Abrasives
  • Antifreeze
  • Artist/Model Paint* (leftover paint must be taken to HHW event but a completely empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Batteries(radios, toys, etc)
  • Car Batteries
  • Fertilizer
  • Fluorescent Bulbs
  • Fungicides
  • Herbicides
  • Insecticides
  • Medicine
  • Mercury (please click here for more information)
  • Mothballs
  • Latex Paint* (leftover paint should be soaked up with kitty litter and placed in the gray cart but the empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Oil Based Paint (leftover paint must be taken to HHW event but a completely empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Scouring Powder
  • Water-Based Paint* (leftover paint should be soaked up with kitty litter and placed in the gray cart but the empty, dried out container can be placed in the blue cart)
  • Weed Killer

Earth Day – April 22, 2013

What do people do

The April 22 Earth Day is usually celebrated with outdoor performances, where individuals or groups perform acts of service to earth. Typical ways of observing Earth Day include planting trees, picking up roadside trash, conducting various programs for recycling and conservation, using recyclable containers for snacks and lunches. Some people are encouraged to sign petitions to governments, calling for stronger or immediate action to stop global warming and to reverse environmental destruction.  Television stations frequently air programs dealing with environmental issues.

earthday

Public Life

Earth Day is not a public holiday and public life, with regard to transport schedules and opening hours for schools and businesses, is not affected.

Background

The April 22 Earth Day, founded by Senator Gaylord Nelson, was first organized in 1970 to promote ecology and respect for life on the planet as well as to encourage awareness of the growing problems of air, water and soil pollution.

Some people prefer to observe Earth Day around the time of the March equinox. In 1978, American anthropologist Margaret Mead added her support for the equinox Earth Day, founded by John McConnell. She stated that the selection of the March Equinox for Earth Day made planetary observance of a shared event possible.

bag-banner

Symbols

Symbols used by people to describe Earth Day include: an image or drawing of planet earth; a tree, a flower or leaves depicting growth; or the recycling symbol. Colors used for Earth Day include natural colors such as green, brown or blue.

The “Earth Flag”, which was designed by John McConnell, has been described as a “flag for all people”. It features a two-sided dye printed image of the Earth from space on a dark blue field, made from recyclable, weather-resistant polyester. Margaret Mead believed that a flag that showed the earth as seen from space was appropriate.

 

 

Ground Squirrels in the Foothills

Squirrels

Keeping Animals Out of Your Garden

Animals

 

 

Try Grasscycling or Composting

What is Grasscycling?
Grasscycling is the natural recycling of grass by leaving the clippings on the lawn when mowing. Grass clippings decompose quickly and release valuable nutrients back into your lawn. It’s simple, and it works! Grass clippings make up a big part of California’s waste during the growing season. To keep these out of the waste stream, try grasscycling!
Grasscycling provides free fertilizer and helps make lawns greener and healthier. Grasscycling reduces turf grass fertilizer and water requirements, which can reduce the toxic runoff that enters storm drains and pollutes creeks and rivers. Grasscycling reduces mowing time too since it eliminates the need to bag and dispose of clippings.
Grasscycling also reduces the amount of yard waste disposed in landfills. Lawns can generate 300 pounds of grass clippings per 1000 square feet annually. For more information on grasscycling from the California Integrated Waste Management Board, visit www.ciwmb.ca.gov.

grasscycle-pic

Backyard Composting
Backyard composting is nature’s way of recycling. Composting is fun, easy and educational. Decomposed organic material such as leaves, grass clippings, twigs, fruit and vegetables make a great soil conditioner. Compost made from leaves and yard trimmings is great for your landscaping. To learn more about composting, visit www.ciwmb.ca.gov. or the “Master Gardener’s of Fresno County” website.

Information & Fun for Kids


Play the Fresno Recycles Game
from http://www.fresno.govClick on the images below to learn more about recycling.

 

Aluminum

Plastic

Glass

Bi-Metal

Paper

If you want to learn more about recycling, go to these kid friendly pages and play the numerous games available.

Kids Pages
Recycle Rex
Clean Sweep U.S.A
EPA Planet Protector’s Club
EPA Recycle City
Kids Recycle
How is Paper Recycled?
The Imagination Factory’s Trash Matcher– Ways to Reuse Garbage Before Throwing it Away
Eek! Recycling and Beyond
Waste No Words– Crossword Puzzle
Earth 911 Kids

What is Recyclable?

Reduce – Buy wisely and buy less. Reduce the amount of products you buy.
Reuse – Give your recyclable items a second chance. Reuse whatever you can and donate good used items to a church or favorite charity.
Recycle – Buy products that are recycled or that can be recycled. Recycle everything you can.

* All Paper
Including books, junk mail, envelopes, newspaper, inserts, telephone books, magazines, catalogs, flattened paper milk cartons, juice boxes, office paper including computer, copy & ledger paper, construction paper & manila folders, paper bags and packaging.

* All Cardboard

Including flattened cereal & other dry food boxes.
* All Plastic (except Styrofoam)
click here for more info on plastic
Including milk & juice containers, shrink & bubble wrap,
plastic grocery bags, & plastic toys.
“Please empty and remove caps”

* ALL Metal

Including aluminum cans, tin/steel cans,
empty paint & aerosol cans, lawn chair frames, metal frames, all steel items (remember all items must fit loosely in your cart).

* Small Appliances

Including transistor radios, blow-dryers, curling irons,
small microwave ovens, coffee pots, toaster ovens, small power tools (batteries removed).

* Glass (empty)
Including all container glass, jars, and bottles.
“No sheet glass, windows, ceramic glass, or mirrors.”

These items do not go in the recycling area.

* Trash, diapers, rubber hoses, carpets, clothing, styrofoam, soiled paper

* Yard clippings, fruit (place in your green cart)

* Motor oil / filters (please see the Used Motor Oil page for more information on Recycling)

* Tires (see Code Enforcement), auto and household batteries (See Household Hazardous Waste)

* Toxic materials (See Household Hazardous Waste above)

Please visit our 
Contamination page for more information.

 

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